Hedging Your Bet Against Poor Hiring Decisions

Bad hires and promotions are very costly to organizations.  Not only in terms of dollars but lost productivity and lowered morale as well.  Wouldn’t it be great if there were a way to discover crucial information that job candidates don’t want you to know?  Actually, there is… and it’s called The Simmons Emotional Intelligence Profile.  This instrument measures 13 characteristics that provide unusually accurate insight into how an individual can be expected to perform on the job.

The characteristics measured by the profile are emotional energy, stress, optimism, self-esteem, work, detail, change, direction, courage, assertiveness, tolerance, consideration, and socialization.  Consider how this information could be helpful.  Imagine that you’re looking to fill a management position, and you discover that your candidate’s assertiveness score is very high and his tolerance level is quite low.  This person would make a scary boss because he would be too aggressive with direct reports and would have no tolerance for mistakes – or anything else that could interfere with his agenda.

Think about how helpful it would be to know that a candidate you’re considering is clinically depressed or in the midst of some type of crisis.  What about someone interviewing for an accounting position who isn’t particularly detail-oriented or a salesperson who doesn’t like to socialize?  And, wouldn’t it be helpful to know that, despite a candidate’s insistence that they would be willing to work any overtime required to get the job done, their work score was on the low side?  The Simmons Profile can give you all this information, and more!

Many hiring managers choose candidates based on the fact that they like them – or that they have experience and a nice resume – or that they know something about the organization.  But, what about their interpersonal skills, their ability to control their emotions, and the amount of empathy they have for others?  No resume or even the best interview can give you that kind of information.  And, nobody would provide a reference that wouldn’t give them a positive recommendation.  So, how helpful could that be in finding out hidden information?

Although hiring decisions should never be made based on only one source of information, doesn’t it make sense to be armed with as much information as possible before making these all-important decisions?  There are probably hundreds of personality inventories that claim to reveal significant information about job applicants, but in my opinion, The Simmons EQ Profile is the most relevant to the business world and the most accurate in predicting behavior.



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